Start Your FREE Membership NOW
 Get Immediate Access to Licensing Articles & Special Features
 Receive Our Weekly eNewsletters, The Deal Sheet,
   The Licensing Advisor and Weekly Wrap Up
 Absolutely NO Risk or Obligation on Your Part -- It's FREE!



Upgrade to Premium Membership NOW for Just $147!
Get 3 Months of Full Premium Membership Access
Includes Our Monthly Newsletter, Licensing News, Deals, and Contacts
And MUCH MORE!
Experiential Licensing

Variations on a Retail Theme

Five years ago, Toys ‘R’ Us opened 350 holiday express pop-up stores during the fourth quarter. The program was vastly scaled back the following year and has pretty much disappeared. And while TRU wasn’t the first to implement a pop-up concept, its efforts in 2009 gave rise to a wide array of much smaller—often single-unit pop-ups—that have been as much about promotion as sales. Among recent examples:

  • Paul Frank has opened a pop-up shop in New York’s paramount hotel, showcasing apparel, sleepwear, accessories, and NYC-themed gifts. The location will be open through January 30, 2015. A charitable component benefits Covenant house.
  • Dreamworks Animations’ AwesomenessTV YouTube network is opening Scene@AwesomenessTV in Los Angeles. The shop features curated merchandise and items that can be personalized, and will host live appearances and other events.
  • Amazon is opening a pop-up test site on Fifth Avenue at 34th Street in Manhattan, across the street from the Empire State Building. This mini warehouse carries a limited inventory of top sellers for same-day deliveries and also showcases Amazon products such as Kindle e-readers, and Fire phones and TVs.
  • Central Perk, a coffee shop in New York City based on the Friends TV series, has also been selling licensed merchandise.

New retail formats aren’t limited to pop-ups—or to the U.S. American Greetings Properties’ Care Bears and Sanrio’s Little Twin Stars (Kiki and Lala, the company’s second most popular characters in Japan, behind Hello Kitty) have a co-branded café in Hiroshima Parco, one of Japan’s largest shopping centers. The concept was developed by Care Bears’ Japanese licensing agent Mindworks Entertainment and Inoue Corporation.

CLOSE TO VIEW ARTICLE x

You have 3 articles left to view this month.

Your 3 Free Articles Per Month Goes Very Quickly!
Get a 3 month Premium Membership to
The Licensing Letter for just $147!

Sign up now and get unlimited access to all articles, archives, and tools for The Licensing Letter!

Close

EMAIL ADDRESS


PASSWORD
EMAIL ADDRESS

FIRST NAME

LAST NAME

TITLE

COMPANY

PHONE

Try Premium Membership

(-000tll-)
()